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forthcoming
Watch for these titles over the coming months.

abecedarium
Author: Dennis Cooley
would you believe me when i make consorts of alphabet runaways & stayathomes i have rounded up where they wandered all over the page Dennis Cooley masterfully extends the genre of the abecedary to explore his curiosity of the limitlessness of human communication. With linguistic wit and complexity, his poetry carries the reader through the historical developments of the alphabet. He pries open letters and words to play with both their immediate meaning and the possibilities within the words themselves, creating surprises as he explores spelling, sound, syntax, and pronunciation. After reading Cooley’s abecedarium you’ll never look at language the same way. Lovers of experimental poetry as well as those interested in linguistic play or the history of language will relish the rapid-fire shifts and musicality of Cooley’s newest collection of poetry.
as if
Author: E. Blodgett
as if there could be no other memory a tree invisible remembering itself In as if, E.D. Blodgett takes readers on journeys of contemplation in which he re-imagines the lyric form. Each line leaves the reader breathless as it runs into the next to form a continuous cycle, a continued breath. The delicate syntax of each piece pushes one forward, ever forward. The poems are Dantesque, leading the traveller through a deeper, darker world. As a collection, as if constitutes an ars poetica of Blodgett’s Apostrophes series. The poems explore the elements that make up the series—strict metrical patterns, the possibilities of breath, the endlessness and seamlessness of the spoken word, the incantation.
Dreaming of Elsewhere - Observations on Home
Author: Esi Edugyan, Introduction: Marina Endicott
Home, for me, was not a birthright, but an invention.… It seems to me when we speak of home we are speaking of several things, often at once, muddled together into an uneasy stew. We say home and mean origins, we say home and mean belonging. These are two different things: where we come from, and where we are. Writing about belonging is not a simple task. Esi Edugyan chooses to intertwine fact and fiction, objective and subjective in an effort to find out if one can belong to more than one place, if home is just a place or if it can be an idea, a person, a memory, or a dream. How “home” changes, how it changes us, and how every farewell carries the promise of a return. Readers of Canadian literature, armchair travellers, and all citizens of the global village will enjoy her explorations and reflections, as we follow her from Ghana to Germany, from Toronto to Budapest, from Paris to New York.
Aboriginal Populations - Social, Demographic, and Epidemiological Perspectives
Editor: Frank Trovato, Editor: Anatole Romaniuk
“The overarching theme of this volume is that Canada’s Aboriginal population has reached a critical stage of social demographic development, from a situation in the past characterized by delayed modernization, extreme socioeconomic deficit, and minimal control over their demography, to a present point of social, political, economic, and demographic ascendancy.” —from the Preface Experts from around the world review and extend the research on Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the circumpolar North, mapping recent changes in their demography, health, and sociology and comparing their conditions with that of Aboriginal Peoples in other countries. Contributors point to policies and research needed to meet the challenges Aboriginal Peoples are likely to face in the 21st century. This substantial volume will prove indispensable and timely to researchers, policy analysts, students, and teachers of social demography and Native Studies. Contributors: Chris Andersen, Nicholas Biddle, Michael J. Chandler, Stewart Clatworthy, Senada Delic, James Frideres, Gustave J. Goldmann, Eric Guimond, Malcom King, Brenda Kobayashi, Tahu H. Kukutai, Ron F. Laliberté, Roger C.A. Maaka, Mary Jane Norris, Evelyn J. Peters, Andrey N. Petrov, Ian Pool, Sarah Prout, Norbert Robitaille, Anatole Romaniuk, Sacha Senécal, C. Matthew Snipp, John Taylor, Frank Trovato, Ravi B.P. Verma, Cora J. Voyageur, Paul C. Whitehead, Mandy L.M. Yap, T. Kue Young.
Little Third Reich on Lake Superior (The) - A History of Canadian Internment Camp R
Author: Ernest Zimmermann, Editor: Michel Beaulieu, Editor: David Ratz
For 18 months during World War II, the Canadian military interned 1,145 prisoners of war in Red Rock, Ontario (about 100 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay). "Camp R" held an unlikely assortment of German prisoners: Nazis, anti-Nazis, Jews, soldiers, merchant seamen, and refugees whom Britain feared might comprise Hitler's rumoured "fifth column" of alien enemies residing within the Commonwealth. For the first time and in riveting detail, the author illuminates the conditions of one of Canada's forgotten POW camps. Through interviews and meticulous archival research, Zimmermann fleshes out this rich history. Written in an accessible, lively style, The Little Third Reich on Lake Superior will captivate military and political historians as well as non-specialists interested in the history of POWs and internment in Canada.
Regenerations - Canadian Women's Writing / Ecriture des femmes au Canada
Editor: Marie Carrière, Editor: Patricia Demers
Buttressed by a wealth of new, collaborative research methods and technologies, the contributors of this collection examine women's writing in Canada, past and present, with 11 essays in English and 5 in French. Regenerations was born out of the inaugural conference of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory held at the Canadian Literature Centre, University of Alberta, and exemplifies the progress of radically interdisciplinary research, collaboration, and publishing efforts surrounding Canadian women's writing. Researchers and students interested in Canadian literature, Québec literature, women’s writing, literary history, feminist theory, and digital humanities scholarship should definitely acquaint themselves with this work. Contributors: Nicole Brossard, Susan Brown, Marie Carrière, Patricia Demers, Louise Dennys, Cinda Gault, Lucie Hotte, Dean Irvine, Gary Kelly, Shauna Lancit, Mary McDonald-Rissanen, Lindsey McMaster, Mary-Jo Romaniuk, Julie Roy, Susan Rudy, Chantal Savoie, Maïté Snauwaert, Rosemary Sullivan, and Sheena Wilson.
Wow, open this! - Paper Engineering in Books and Artists’ Books
Author: Kevin Zak
Throughout its history, movable elements in books, commonly called pop-ups, have been used to educate, entertain, and inspire both children and adults. "Wow, open this!" looks at the art and science of moveable elements incorporated into books. Books that delight children with that ‘wow’ moment, as a scene comes to life in their hands, were first used in scholarly works to help illustrate a vast array of topics such as geometry, architecture, medical and natural science, cryptography, astronomy, calendars, time telling, navigation, and cosmography. Primarily used as entertainment today, movable elements and variations of the pop-up book are also used by artists who want to challenge our assumptions about what a book really is by reinterpreting the form and how it functions.
Climber's Paradise - Making Canada's Mountain Parks, 1906-1974
Author: PearlAnn Reichwein
The mountain parks are for all Canadians for all time and their value cannot be measured in terms of how many access roads, motels, souvenir shops and golf courses we've provided. —Bob Jordan, 1971, Member of the ACC The Alpine Club of Canada imagined the Rockies and neighbouring ranges to the west and the north as a "climber's paradise." Through a century of adventure and advocacy, the ACC led the way to mountain pursuits in spectacular regions. Historian and mountain studies specialist PearlAnn Reichwein’s research is informed by her experiences mountaineering and by her interest in mountain culture. She presents a compelling case for understanding wild places and human activity within them as parts of a whole. A work of invaluable scholarship in the areas of environmental history, public policy, sport studies, recreation, and tourism, Climber’s Paradise will appeal to many non-specialists, mountaineers, environmentalists, and travellers across Canada and beyond.
Conrad Kain - Letters from a Wandering Mountain Guide, 1906-1933
Author: Conrad Kain, Editor: Zac Robinson, Introduction: Zac Robinson, Translator: Maria Koch, Translator: John Koch, Foreword: Chic Scott
Conrad Kain is a titan amongst climbers in Canada and is well-known in mountaineering circles all over the world. His letters to Amelie Malek—a life-long friend—offer a candid view into the deepest thoughts of the Austrian mountain guide, and are a perfect complement to his autobiography, Where the Clouds Can Go. The 144 letters provide a unique and personal view of what it meant to immigrate to Canada in the early part of the twentieth century. Kain’s letters are ordered chronologically with annotations, keeping the sections in English untouched, while those in German have been carefully translated. Historians and mountain culture enthusiasts worldwide will appreciate Kain’s genius for description, his passion for nature, his opinions, and his musings about his life.
Personal Modernisms - Anarchist Networks and the Later Avant-Gardes
Author: James Gifford
Gifford’s invigorating work of metacriticism and literary history recovers the significance of the “lost generation” of writers of the 1930s and 1940s. He examines how the Personalism of anarcho-anti-authoritarian contemporaries such as Alex Comfort, Robert Duncan, Lawrence Durrell, J.F. Hendry, Henry Miller, Elizabeth Smart, Dylan Thomas, and Henry Treece forges a missing link between Late Modernist and postmodernist literature. He concludes by applying his recontextualization to four familiar texts by Miller, Durrell, Smart, and Duncan, and encourages readers to re-engage the lost generation using this new critical lens. Scholars and students of literary modernism, 20th century Canadian literature, and anarchism will find a productive vision of this neglected period within Personal Modernisms.
Small things left behind
Author: Ella Zeltserman
“Freedom is something my father has never known. How do I explain freedom to the ones born bent?” —from “Not Scared” Ella Zeltserman’s poetry cuts both ways. The story of her flight from the USSR in 1979—of the young family she brought to Edmonton and the older one she left behind—does “explain freedom to the ones born bent,” but it also explains oppression to the ones born free. Deftly modulating language, imagery, and events of past and present, comfort and tyranny, atrocity and family, home and war, Leningrad and Edmonton, she touches readers emotionally, drawing them into the journey. This authentic account of Russian-Jewish immigration to Canada during the Cold War will speak to all who have left their country or who moved far away from home.
Landscapes of War and Memory - The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977-2007
Author: Sherrill Grace
“That Canada remains a society haunted by its war history seems clear....” Since 1977, a new generation of Canadian writers and artists has been mapping the cultural landscapes formed by the memories of war we have inherited, and also the ones we are expected to forget. Challenging, even painful, the art and literature in Grace’s magisterial study build causeways into history, connecting us to trials and traumas many Canadians have never known but that haunt society in subtle and compelling ways. A contemporary scholar of the period under examination, Grace exemplifies her role as witness, investing the text with personal, often lyrical, responses as a way of enacting this crucial memory work. This comprehensive study is intended for Canadians, scholars, and students interested in literature, theatre, and art relating to memories of the world wars.
Upgrading Oilsands Bitumen and Heavy Oil
Author: Murray Gray
“The emphasis throughout is to link the fundamentals of the molecules through to the economic drivers for the industry, because this combination determines the technology used for processing.”—From the Introduction The high demand for quality petroleum products necessitates ongoing innovation in the science and engineering underlying oilsands extraction and upgrading. Beginning with a thorough grounding in the composition, fluid properties, reaction behaviour, and economics of bitumen and heavy oil, Murray Gray then delves into current processing technologies, particularly those used at full commercial scale. The tables of data on composition, yield, and behaviour of oilsands bitumen and heavy oil fractions are extensive. Though the focus is on bitumen from Alberta's oilsands—the largest resource in the world—the science applies to upgrading of heavy oil and petroleum residue feeds worldwide. Upgrading Oilsands Bitumen and Heavy Oil lays out the current best practice for engineers and scientists in the oilsands and refining industries, government personnel, academics, and students.
Chinchaga Firestorm (The) - When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue
Author: Cordy Tymstra, Foreword: Mike Flannigan
The biggest firestorm documented in North America—3,500,000 acres of forest burned in northern Alberta and British Columbia—created the world’s largest smoke layer in the atmosphere. The smoke was seen around the world, causing the moon and the sun to appear blue. The Chinchaga Firestorm is a historical study of the effects of fire on the ecological process. Using technical explanations and archival discoveries, the author shows the beneficial yet destructive effects of forest fires, including the 2011 devastation of Slave Lake, Alberta. Cordy Tymstra tells the stories of communities and individuals as their lives intersected with the path of the wildfire—stories that demonstrate people’s spirit, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency, and persistence in the struggle against nature’s devastating power. The 1950 event changed the way these fires are fought in Alberta. Forest fire scientists, foresters, forest ecologists and policy makers, as well as those who are interested in western Canadian history and ecology, will definitely want this book in their library.
Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities - Resisting a Dangerous Order
Author: Shawna Ferris, Foreword: Amy Lebovitch
“Our voices scrubbed out and forgotten. There are those who research and write about sex workers who often forget we are human.”– Amy Lebovitch Canadian cities are striving for high safety ratings by eliminating crime, which includes “cleaning” urban areas of the street sex industry. Ironically, those same sex workers also want to live and work in a safe environment. Shawna Ferris interrogates sanitizing political agendas, analyzes exclusionary legislative and police initiatives, and examines media representations. She gives a voice to sex workers who are often pushed to the background, even by those who fight for them. In the name of urban safety and orderliness, street sex workers face stigma, racism, and ignorance. Their human rights are ignored, and some even lose their lives. Ferris aims to reveal the cultural dimensions of this discrimination through literary and art-critical theory, legal and sociological research, and activist intervention. This book has much to offer to educators and activists, sex workers and anti-violence organizations, and academics studying women, cultural, gender, or indigenous issues.
Theatre, Teens, Sex Ed - Are We There Yet?
Author: Jan Selman, Author: Jane Heather
When the topic is sex, fear and embarrassment prevent frank and meaningful communication between teens and adults. Using participatory theatre can break the uncomfortable silence, and with over 700 performances across Canada, Jane Heather’s play Are We There Yet? has been an effective tool for teaching teen sexuality since 1998. The play and program were the subject of a major impact assessment and researchers of many kinds examined how and why theatre can make change. This comprehensive, well-organized volume by two leading experts offers a rich diversity of material and analysis. The play appears in the volume and is available for separate purchase as a reproducible PDF, and a video production of examples of theatrical participation is included on a pocketed DVD. Theatre, Teens, Sex Ed will be a valuable resource for academics, practitioners, and specialist readerships in the fields of theatre, sex education, sociology, and public health. Contributors: Tracy L. Bear, Shaniff Esmail, Brenda Munro, James McKinnon, and the Are We There Yet? Community University Research Alliance.
Canada's Constitutional Revolution
Author: Barry Strayer
From 1960 to 1982 Barry L. Strayer was instrumental in the design of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the patriation of Canada’s Constitution. Here Dr. Strayer shares his experiences as a key legal advisor with a clear, personal voice that yields an insightful contribution to Canadian history and political memoir. He discusses the personal philosophies of Pierre Trudeau and F.R. Scott in addition to his meticulous accounts of the events and people involved in Canada’s constitutional reform, and the consequences of that reform, which reveal that it was truly a revolution. This is an accessible primary source for experts and non-specialists interested in constitutional history studies, political history of patriation and The Charter, interpretation of The Charter, and the nature of judicial review.
Healing Histories - Stories from Canada's Indian Hospitals
Author: Laurie Meijer Drees
Healing Histories is the first detailed collection of Aboriginal perspectives on the history of tuberculosis in Canada’s indigenous communities and on the federal government’s Indian Health Services. Featuring oral accounts from patients, families, and workers who experienced Canada’s Indian Hospital System, it presents a fresh perspective on health care history that includes the diverse voices and insights of the many people affected by tuberculosis and its treatment in the mid-twentieth century. This intercultural history models new methodologies and ethics for researching and writing about indigenous Canada based on indigenous understandings of “story” and its critical role in Aboriginal historicity, while moving beyond routine colonial interpretations of victimization, oppression and cultural destruction. Written for both academic and popular reading audiences, Healing Histories is essential reading for those interested in Canadian Aboriginal history, history of medicine and nursing, and oral history.
Boom and Bust Again - Policy Challenges for a Commodity-Based Economy
Editor: David Ryan
In many commodity-based economies, rollercoaster boom-and-bust cycles have come to be viewed almost as an unavoidable characteristic. Framed mainly in the context of the Alberta economy, the articles in this volume explore a wide range of issues associated with the historical phenomenon of recurring periods of boom and bust, including reasons for their apparent inevitability, dealing with revenue volatility, possible diversification strategies, savings policy, and challenges faced by policy makers. Re-examining and shedding new light on these struggles, Boom and Bust Again is an important contribution to the literature on policy issues for readers in the fields of economics, business, finance, and public policy. Contributors: Robert L. Ascah, Jason Brisbois, Colin Busby, Edward J. Chambers, Bev Dahlby, Stephen Duckett, J. C. Herbert Emery, Nicholas Emter, Roger Gibbins, Brad R. Humphreys, Ronald Kneebone, Gordon Kramer, Stuart Landon, Kathleen Macaspac, Victor A. Matheson, Melville McMillan, John D. Murray, Alice O. Nakamura, Al O'Brien, David L. Ryan, Liesje Sarnecki, Constance Smith.
We Gambled Everything - The Life and Times of an Oilman
Author: Arne Nielsen, Foreword: Peter Newman
“We gambled everything—our careers, our fortunes, the future of our nation—and every day brought new discoveries. It was like living on a frontier.”—Arne Nielsen The memoir of Canadian petroleum industry leader Arne Nielsen is not a conventional business biography. During his six decades in the business, he witnessed critical events in the oil industry that influenced Canada’s economic history. From rain-soaked tents on the Arctic barren land to the luxurious New York offices of a multinational oil company, Arne Nielsen’s expansive knowledge of geology and the oil industry made him one of the most influential and well-known figures of his time. His memoir provides crucial details and unique perspectives on events that will be of interest to the next generation of oil industry executives as well as to consumers, economists, and ecologists.
Adapted Physical Activity
Editor: Robert Steadward, Editor: Garry Wheeler, Editor: E. Watkinson
The field of Adapted Physical Activity is a rapidly expanding area in post-secondary education. As the profession grows, so does the demand for new texts that challenge students to think critically. "Adapted Physical Activity" edited by Steadward, Wheeler and Watkinson is a textbook that combines up-to-date information with a critical thinking approach. Based on a core theme of "inclusion", this text examines the spectrum of adapted physical activity from school, community, and international disability sports perspectives. This comprehensive examination provides the reader with a unique and up to date insight into the scope of adapted physical activity. The text deals with a variety of important issues ranging from the provision of equal access to active living opportunities, schools and communities, to instructional and educational issues, to the history of disability sport and issues regarding sports performance in athletes with disability. Contributions by a who's who of Canadian experts render this text a must have for instruction in the area of Adapted Physical Activity or Education at all levels of post secondary education. The text is constructed in a flexible thematic and modular format allowing instructors at all levels of post secondary education - undergraduate and graduate - to select areas for study or integrate various selections of chapters into individual courses.
Spirit of the Alberta Indian Treaties (The)
Government and First Nations leaders have tended to operate within two different systems of knowledge and perception regarding treaty rights issues in Canada. While First Nations emphasize the original spirit or intent of an agreement, government stresses the letter of the agreement. The Spirit of the Alberta Indian Treaties has long been acknowledged as an authoritative source for both oral and documentary perspectives on Alberta treaties. It has been twice cited in landmark decisions by the Supreme Court of Canada since its original publication in 1979. Expanded, and with a new introduction by Richard Price, this third edition supports a growing understanding between leaders of government and First Nations people in Alberta and Canada.
Richard Price

  
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