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Landscapes of War and Memory - The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977-2007
Sherrill Grace
UAP books
excellent works of scholarship
The University of Alberta Press publishes excellent works of scholarship and fine books for general readers. Our publishing program includes quality nonfiction as well as textbooks, fiction, and poetry. We publish authors from the Edmonton area, across Canada, and around the world.

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Landscapes of War and Memory - The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977-2007
Sherrill Grace
“That Canada remains a society haunted by its war history seems clear....” Since 1977, a new generation of Canadian writers and artists has been mapping the cultural landscapes formed by the memories of war we have inherited, and also the ones we are expected to forget. Challenging, even painful, the art and literature in Grace’s magisterial study build causeways into history, connecting us to trials and traumas many Canadians have never known but that haunt society in subtle and compelling ways. A contemporary scholar of the period under examination, Grace exemplifies her role as witness, investing the text with personal, often lyrical, responses as a way of enacting this crucial memory work. This comprehensive study is intended for Canadians, scholars, and students interested in literature, theatre, and art relating to memories of the world wars.
The Thinking Heart - The Literary Archive of Wilfred Watson
Paul Hjartarson, Shirley Neuman
This exhibition catalogue celebrates the life and work of avant garde poet and playwright Wilfred Watson. Drawing on the rich collection of letters, notebooks, manuscripts and sketchbooks in the University of Alberta Archives’ Wilfred Watson Fonds, this exhibition traces Watson’s development from his early encounters with the work of T.S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas and Emily Carr to his decades-long engagement with the writing of Gabriel Marcel, Wyndham Lewis, and Marshall McLuhan, and from his initial work on stage to his career-changing involvement in the Edmonton theatre community centred on Studio Theatre, Walterdale Theatre and the Yardbird Suite. The archives include a rich correspondence between Wilfred Watson and his wife, Sheila Watson, and many notebook entries describing the two writers' lifelong dialogue.
Conrad Kain - Letters from a Wandering Mountain Guide, 1906-1933
Conrad Kain
Editor Zac Robinson
Introduction Zac Robinson
Translator Maria Koch, John Koch
Foreword Chic Scott
Conrad Kain is a titan amongst climbers in Canada and is well-known in mountaineering circles all over the world. His letters to Amelie Malek—a life-long friend—offer a candid view into the deepest thoughts of the Austrian mountain guide, and are a perfect complement to his autobiography, Where the Clouds Can Go. The 144 letters provide a unique and personal view of what it meant to immigrate to Canada in the early part of the twentieth century. Kain’s letters are ordered chronologically with annotations, keeping the sections in English untouched, while those in German have been carefully translated. Historians and mountain culture enthusiasts worldwide will appreciate Kain’s genius for description, his passion for nature, his opinions, and his musings about his life.
Personal Modernisms - Anarchist Networks and the Later Avant-Gardes
James Gifford
Gifford’s invigorating work of metacriticism and literary history recovers the significance of the “lost generation” of writers of the 1930s and 1940s. He examines how the Personalism of anarcho-anti-authoritarian contemporaries such as Alex Comfort, Robert Duncan, Lawrence Durrell, J.F. Hendry, Henry Miller, Elizabeth Smart, Dylan Thomas, and Henry Treece forges a missing link between Late Modernist and postmodernist literature. He concludes by applying his recontextualization to four familiar texts by Miller, Durrell, Smart, and Duncan, and encourages readers to re-engage the lost generation using this new critical lens. Scholars and students of literary modernism, 20th century Canadian literature, and anarchism will find a productive vision of this neglected period within Personal Modernisms.
Regenerations - Canadian Women's Writing / Ecriture des femmes au Canada
Editor Marie Carrière, Patricia Demers
Buttressed by a wealth of new, collaborative research methods and technologies, the contributors of this collection examine women's writing in Canada, past and present, with 11 essays in English and 5 in French. Regenerations was born out of the inaugural conference of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory held at the Canadian Literature Centre, University of Alberta, and exemplifies the progress of radically interdisciplinary research, collaboration, and publishing efforts surrounding Canadian women's writing. Researchers and students interested in Canadian literature, Québec literature, women’s writing, literary history, feminist theory, and digital humanities scholarship should definitely acquaint themselves with this work. Contributors: Nicole Brossard, Susan Brown, Marie Carrière, Patricia Demers, Louise Dennys, Cinda Gault, Lucie Hotte, Dean Irvine, Gary Kelly, Shauna Lancit, Mary McDonald-Rissanen, Lindsey McMaster, Mary-Jo Romaniuk, Julie Roy, Susan Rudy, Chantal Savoie, Maïté Snauwaert, Rosemary Sullivan, and Sheena Wilson.
Climber's Paradise - Making Canada's Mountain Parks, 1906-1974
PearlAnn Reichwein
The mountain parks are for all Canadians for all time and their value cannot be measured in terms of how many access roads, motels, souvenir shops and golf courses we've provided. —Bob Jordan, 1971, Member of the ACC The Alpine Club of Canada imagined the Rockies and neighbouring ranges to the west and the north as a "climber's paradise." Through a century of adventure and advocacy, the ACC led the way to mountain pursuits in spectacular regions. Historian and mountain studies specialist PearlAnn Reichwein’s research is informed by her experiences mountaineering and by her interest in mountain culture. She presents a compelling case for understanding wild places and human activity within them as parts of a whole. A work of invaluable scholarship in the areas of environmental history, public policy, sport studies, recreation, and tourism, Climber’s Paradise will appeal to many non-specialists, mountaineers, environmentalists, and travellers across Canada and beyond.
Painted Faces on the Prairies - Cantonese Opera and the Edmonton Chinese Community
Helen Cheung
his exhibition catalogue traces close to one hundred years of Cantonese opera in Edmonton within the changing dynamics of the Chinese community. It tells a story of life experiences on the Prairies by highlighting the inextricable relationship between Cantonese opera and the Edmonton Chinese community as this cultural practice moves deftly through historical periods between 1890 and 2009. This period has been selected to coincide with the arrival of the first Chinese in Edmonton in 1890 and the inscription of Cantonese opera onto the Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity list of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2009. The text brings to life many stories of the struggles and successes of the Chinese in Edmonton, highlighting their resiliency and love of life through the cultural practice of Cantonese opera.
small things left behind
Ella Zeltserman
“Freedom is something my father has never known. How do I explain freedom to the ones born bent?” —from “Not Scared” Ella Zeltserman’s poetry cuts both ways. The story of her flight from the USSR in 1979—of the young family she brought to Edmonton and the older one she left behind—does “explain freedom to the ones born bent,” but it also explains oppression to the ones born free. Deftly modulating language, imagery, and events of past and present, comfort and tyranny, atrocity and family, home and war, Leningrad and Edmonton, she touches readers emotionally, drawing them into the journey. This authentic account of Russian-Jewish immigration to Canada during the Cold War will speak to all who have left their country or who moved far away from home.
Aboriginal Populations - Social, Demographic, and Epidemiological Perspectives
Editor Frank Trovato
“The overarching theme of this volume is that Canada’s Aboriginal population has reached a critical stage of transition, from a situation in the past characterized by delayed modernization, extreme socio-economic deficit, and minimal control over their demography, to a point of social, political, economic, and demographic ascendancy.” —from the Preface Experts from around the world review and extend the research on Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the circumpolar North, mapping recent changes in their demography, health, and sociology and comparing their conditions with that of Aboriginal Peoples in other countries. Contributors point to policies and research needed to meet the challenges Aboriginal Peoples are likely to face in the 21st century. This substantial volume will prove indispensable and timely to researchers, policy analysts, students, and teachers of social demography and Native Studies. Contributors: Chris Andersen, Nicholas Biddle, Michael J. Chandler, Stewart Clatworthy, Senada Delic, James Frideres, Gustave J. Goldmann, Eric Guimond, Malcolm King, Brenda Kobayashi, Tahu H. Kukutai, Ron F. Laliberté, Roger C.A. Maaka, Mary Jane Norris, Evelyn J. Peters, Andrey N. Petrov, Ian Pool, Sarah Prout, Norbert Robitaille, Anatole Romaniuk, Sacha Senécal, C. Matthew Snipp, John Taylor, Frank Trovato, Ravi B.P. Verma, Cora J. Voyageur, Paul C. Whitehead, Mandy L.M. Yap, T. Kue Young.
Aboriginal Populations - Social, Demographic, and Epidemiological Perspectives
Editor Frank Trovato, Anatole Romaniuk
“The overarching theme of this volume is that Canada’s Aboriginal population has reached a critical stage of transition, from a situation in the past characterized by delayed modernization, extreme socio-economic deficit, and minimal control over their demography, to a point of social, political, economic, and demographic ascendancy.” —from the Preface Experts from around the world review and extend the research on Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the circumpolar North, mapping recent changes in their demography, health, and sociology and comparing their conditions with that of Aboriginal Peoples in other countries. Contributors point to policies and research needed to meet the challenges Aboriginal Peoples are likely to face in the 21st century. This substantial volume will prove indispensable and timely to researchers, policy analysts, students, and teachers of social demography and Native Studies. Contributors: Chris Andersen, Nicholas Biddle, Michael J. Chandler, Stewart Clatworthy, Senada Delic, James Frideres, Gustave J. Goldmann, Eric Guimond, Malcolm King, Brenda Kobayashi, Tahu H. Kukutai, Ron F. Laliberté, Roger C.A. Maaka, Mary Jane Norris, Evelyn J. Peters, Andrey N. Petrov, Ian Pool, Sarah Prout, Norbert Robitaille, Anatole Romaniuk, Sacha Senécal, C. Matthew Snipp, John Taylor, Frank Trovato, Ravi B.P. Verma, Cora J. Voyageur, Paul C. Whitehead, Mandy L.M. Yap, T. Kue Young.
Aboriginal Populations - Social, Demographic, and Epidemiological Perspectives
Editor Anatole Romaniuk
“The overarching theme of this volume is that Canada’s Aboriginal population has reached a critical stage of transition, from a situation in the past characterized by delayed modernization, extreme socio-economic deficit, and minimal control over their demography, to a point of social, political, economic, and demographic ascendancy.” —from the Preface Experts from around the world review and extend the research on Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the circumpolar North, mapping recent changes in their demography, health, and sociology and comparing their conditions with that of Aboriginal Peoples in other countries. Contributors point to policies and research needed to meet the challenges Aboriginal Peoples are likely to face in the 21st century. This substantial volume will prove indispensable and timely to researchers, policy analysts, students, and teachers of social demography and Native Studies. Contributors: Chris Andersen, Nicholas Biddle, Michael J. Chandler, Stewart Clatworthy, Senada Delic, James Frideres, Gustave J. Goldmann, Eric Guimond, Malcolm King, Brenda Kobayashi, Tahu H. Kukutai, Ron F. Laliberté, Roger C.A. Maaka, Mary Jane Norris, Evelyn J. Peters, Andrey N. Petrov, Ian Pool, Sarah Prout, Norbert Robitaille, Anatole Romaniuk, Sacha Senécal, C. Matthew Snipp, John Taylor, Frank Trovato, Ravi B.P. Verma, Cora J. Voyageur, Paul C. Whitehead, Mandy L.M. Yap, T. Kue Young.

  
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