These interactive maps comprise an online addendum to Culturing Wilderness, Chapter 3: "Following the Base of the Foothills" — Tracing the Boundaries of Jasper Park and its Adjacent Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve. The maps available are:
Map 3.1: 1902–1910—Rocky Mountains Park, Jasper Forest Park, and the Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve
Map 3.2: 1911–1913—Diminished Parks, Expanded Forest Reserve
Map 3.3: 1914–1922—Expanded Parks, Expanded Forest Reserve
Map 3.4: 1923–1927—Jasper Park extended South
Map 3.5: 1928–1929—Park Boundaries Adjusted
Map 3.6: 1930—Transfer of Resources and Trade-Offs

The map viewer requires Flash 6+. You can download Flash here

Map 3.1
1902–1910—Rocky Mountains Park, Jasper Forest Park, and the Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve
Rocky Mountains Park established by Rocky Mountains Park Act (1887, Chapter 32), which incorporated Hot Springs Reserve (1885, Privy Council # 2197); expanded in 1902 (Chapter 31), and incorporated Lake Louise Forest Park (1892, PC #1891).
Jasper Forest Park established in 1907 (PC #1323) and boundary clarified in 1909 (PC #1068).
Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve established in 1910 (PC #939).
Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) reached Kicking Horse Pass in 1883; completed in November 1885.
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) reached Edson in 1910.

Map 3.2
1911–1913—Diminished Parks, Expanded Forest Reserve
Rocky Mountains Park reduced in area in 1911 (Privy Council #1338) to comprise the Bow River watershed west of the Kananaskis River. ()
Jasper Park reduced in 1911 (PC #1338) to a strip 16 kilometres wide along both sides of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR).
Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve increased in area from former parks and expanded eastwards in 1911 (Chapter 10) and 1913 (Chapter 18).
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) reaches Jasper in 1911; passenger service begins in 1912; line extended to Tête Jaune Cache area in 1913.
Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) crosses Yellowhead Pass in 1913, but bridges across Pembina and McLeod rivers not yet completed.
GTPR Coal Branch (GTPR-CB) line started in 1911, completed to Lovett in 1912, extended to Cadomin and Mountain Park in 1913.

Map 3.3
1914–1922—Expanded Parks, Expanded Forest Reserve
Rocky Mountains Park increased in area in 1917 (Privy Council #2594), extending south to include the watersheds of the Kananaskis and Spray rivers, and extending north as far as the south bank of the Clearwater River.
Jasper Park increased in area in 1914 (PC #1165) to include the entire upper Athabasca River watershed, making the Brazeau River the new south boundary and Township 51 the new north boundary.
Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve reduced by areas transferred to parks.
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) completed to Prince Rupert in February 1914.
Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) to Vancouver opened in October 1915.
GTPR and CNoR lines consolidated in 1917. Spur line to Pocahontas kept open for service until coal mine closed in 1921 (see Map 3.4).
GTPR Coal Branch (GTPR-CB) line extended to Luscar in 1921.
Canadian Northern Western Railway (CNoWR) opened to Rocky Mountain House and Nordegg in 1914.

Map 3.4
1923–1927—Jasper Park extended South
Rocky Mountains Park not changed.
Jasper Park increased in area to the south in 1927 (Order-in-Council #637) to include portions of the upper North Saskatchewan River watershed, including parts of Siffleur, Cline, Cataract, and Brazeau River basins, and Mistaya River to Bow Summit.
Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve increased in area in 1923 (An Act to Amend the Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act, 1923) by the addition of 68 sections in Township 41, but reduced in area by 1927 transfers to parks.
Canadian National Railways (CNR) created in 1923; combined Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) and Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) into a single line.
Spur line to Pocahontas, served only by Park “speeder,” abandoned around 1924; then grade converted to a road.
New bridge across Athabasca River between Solomon Creek and Entrance opened by CNR in 1927.

Map 3.5
1928–1929—Park Boundaries Adjusted
Rocky Mountains Park increased in area in 1929 (Order-in-Council #158) by transfer of area south of the Brazeau River that had been added to Jasper Park in 1927; increased as well by an area of 267 square kilometres around Mount Malloch along the Clearwater River.
Jasper Park reduced in area in 1929 by areas south of the Brazeau River that 
were transferred to Rocky Mountains Park, but increased in area (Order-in-Council #159) by small strips along the Brazeau and Southesk-Rocky rivers to eastern height of land; north boundary changed to heights of land and lines-of-sight 
across valleys.
Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve reduced in area by 1929 transfers to parks.
In 1928 CNR main line between Obed and Hinton moved to rehabilitated former GTPR grade; abandoned grade used as road.

Map 3.6
1930—Transfer of Resources and Trade-Offs
Banff National Park (renamed from Rocky Mountains Park) reduced in area by transfer to Alberta of Kananaskis River watershed, parts of Spray and Ghost River watersheds, and an area in the angle of the Cline and Siffleur rivers (National Parks Act).
Jasper National Park reduced in area by transfer to the Province of Alberta of lands along its eastern border from Rock Lake through Brûlé, and south through the heads of Prairie Creek and Gregg River (National Parks Act).
Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve increased in area by transfers of land from parks, and the entire Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve transferred to the Province of Alberta in the Alberta Natural Resources Act, 1930.